Lessons from Moving: Part 3

Our recent migration path
Our recent migration path

We are taught in genealogy lectures to examine our ancestors’ friends, associates and neighbors because often people associated with relatives and/or moved to different locations with of associates who were not relatives. In pondering this concept and comparing it to my current situation, I am struck by how different our lives and connections are now than they were for our ancestors.

No one moved with us. It was my husband and myself, our two kids and four pets. Our nearest relatives now live over 3 hours away, relatives we are getting reacquainted with but that we weren’t really close to prior to moving. The only people we knew in Austin were acquaintances, our realtor, and I happened to know of a few genealogists in the area as well. My husband doesn’t have an actual office yet at the building here because the project is so brand new they aren’t done building it and organizing all of the employees on the project yet, so no real work friends for him yet. The point being that if you tried to find a “FAN Club” reason for our move you couldn’t.¹

I imagine to future researchers the migration patterns of today look a lot different, more confusing perhaps than those of our ancestors. Generally speaking, the patterns of US migration generally move from the east coast to the west. (I know this is a big generalization and I have several exceptions in my research.) Also, generally you can locate groups of people who migrated together. I’m sure it happens today, but I would guess not as much. We are a lot more independent, less support is needed from our family and neighbors for survival. From grocery stores to gas stations, indoor plumbing to wi-fi, we generally have everything we need or can find it for ourselves.

Does it feel more isolated? Or maybe it’s just me still adapting to a move and still finding my new network of friends, associates and neighbors. Don’t worry. We are adapting. My next posts will be on how we are working to build our new FAN club.


1. The “FAN Club” principle is attributed to the work of Elizabeth Shown Mills. Elizabeth Shown Mills, QuickSheet: The Historical Biographer’s Guide to Cluster Research (the FAN Principle) (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2012). Also see, Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 11: Identity Problems & the FAN Principle,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation & Source Usage (www.evidenceexplained.com : accessed 27 May 2015).

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8 thoughts on “Lessons from Moving: Part 3

  1. Today, we don’t need “protection” from our family, friends and neighbors as we move. But I can think of times when someone might moved to be close to family (children or grandchildren). Great post!

  2. Hi Cari,
    I enjoy all your posts but after this series I’ve added a new topic to my research notes. I need to make sure to record the reason why family members who were alive in my lifetime moved, for example, why my mother and her siblings all left rural Virginia and moved to Washington, DC. Thanks to you I will make sure that information is part of their stories.
    See you soon at GRIP.

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